Prairie Church

index of sculptures 1988 to 2023

Prairie Church

2010
Bas-relief in salvaged wood #66, 57 x 42 x 10 cm.
Collection of Charles Kitchings, Los Angeles, California, United States.


Web image applied to the back of Prairie Church :
“Inside the Abandoned St. Olaf Church in Williams County North Dakota”
(source: jpipsqueak.wordpress.com/2012/11/02/256 )






Part of the Shallow Wade exhibition in 2010 at OkOk gallery, in Seattle, WA, USA.


Shotgun Shack Row

index of sculptures 1988 to 2023

Shotgun Shack Row

2010
Bas-relief in salvaged wood #64, 236 x 84 x 14 cm.
Private collection, Old Lyme, Connecticut, United States.



A ‘shotgun shack’ is a narrow home, usually no more than 3.5 m wide, with rooms arranged one behind the other, and doors at each end of the house, a design which assists ventilation. Shotgun houses were popular in the Southern United States from the end of the American Civil War until the late 1920s. Its origins were probably Haitian and African, and the style is most commonly associated with New Orleans; but they can be found as far away as Chicago, Key West and California. As a sign of its New Orleans heritage, the house is usually raised two to three feet off the ground.
(source: wikipedia.org/wiki/Shotgun_house) 

“Children’s bicycles and Mardi Gras beads remained from a oated away house at Deslonde Street in the Lower Ninth Ward in fog at morning. New Orleans, Louisiana, January 30, 2006”
(photo by Alexey Sergeev: asergeev.com)






Part of the Shallow Wade exhibition in 2010 at OkOk gallery, in Seattle, WA, USA.


On Re-Entry

index of sculptures 1988 to 2023

On Re-Entry (Burning Log)

2010
Bas-relief in salvaged wood #63, 262 x 87 x 12 cm.
Collection of Leslie and Dale Chihuly, Seattle, Washington, United States.

Sewer outlet on the river Ganga. The rear image of On Re-Entry . 






Part of the Shallow Wade exhibition in 2010 at OkOk gallery, in Seattle, WA, USA.


Taylor / Burton

index of sculptures 1988 to 2023

Taylor / Burton

2009
Bas-relief in salvaged wood #62, 165 x 95 x 11cm.
Private collection Bethesda, Maryland, United States.

Photograph of a diamond mine laborer placing explosive charges.
Copyright Uniepers. Image taken from the book ‘Vier Eeuwen Diamant’ (1986).
The image was applied to the back of the Taylor/Burton 

Taylor/Burton

The rough diamond, weighing 241 carats (48.2 g), was found in 1966 in the Premier Mine in South Africa and was cut by Harry Winston to 69.42 carats in a pear shape. It was bought in 1969 by Richard Burton and Liz Taylor for over a million dollars, creating great publicity. Burton and Taylor were top movie stars in those days and arguably the most famous couple in the world. Sale of the diamond conferred naming rights and they accordingly named it the Taylor- Burton Diamond. After their divorce in 1974, Taylor auctioned the diamond for $5 million. Its current owner is Robert Mouawad, a Lebanese diamond dealer and owner of many famous gems.
(source: wikipedia.org/wiki/Taylor-Burton_Diamond

Hand of Harry Winston filled with precious stones.

‘In this photo, Harry Winston holds some of his famous gems in the palm of his hand. The 125.35 carat emerald-cut Jonker diamond is center. Just under the Jonker is the 94.80 carat pear shaped Star of the East diamond. The 45.52 carat blue Hope diamond rests between his index and middle nger. The 337.10 carat Sapphire of Catherine the Great is next to his thumb, and the 70.21 carat Idol’s Eye diamond is just above the Jonker. A matched pair of pear shaped diamonds and a larger ruby are also shown.’ In his day Harry Winston (1896 -1978) was possibly the most famous jeweler in the world. His name is immortalized in Marily Monroe’s 1953 film version of the song Diamonds Are a Girl’s Best Friend: ‘Talk to me, Harry Winston, tell me all about it!’
(source: harrywinston.comwikipedia.org/wiki/ Harry_Winston)






Part of the Shallow Wade exhibition in 2010 at OkOk gallery, in Seattle, WA, USA.


NASCAR Charger

index of sculptures 1988 to 2023

NASCAR Charger

2009
Bas-relief in salvaged wood #60, three parts, total dim. 305 x 96 x 10cm.
Collection of Bram en Eva Fioole, Rotterdam, Netherlands.






Part of the Shallow Wade exhibition in 2010 at OkOk gallery, in Seattle, WA, USA.


Limo 1

index of sculptures 1988 to 2023

Limo 1

2009
Bas-relief in salvaged wood #59, 184 x 115 x 12cm.
Private collection Bassano Del Grappa, Italy.


Limo 1 is based on the Cadillac Fleetwood, state car to Ronald Reagan in the early eighties.

Ronald Reagan pointing a gun in defense of a boy.
Clipping of a movie poster pasted to the back of the Limo 1 relief.

The interior of Ronald Reagans presidential limousine.
(source)

Limo 1

The 1984 Cadillac Fleetwood Seventy Five was the Presidential Limousine used by President Ronald Reagan.

“After decades of Lincolns, Cadillac was finally given the chance to produce a limousine for the secret service in the early 1980s during the Reagan administration. Appearing in 1984 was a pair of 1983 Fleetwoods built by Hess & Eisenhardt. Since the coachbuilder started with production Fleetwood limousines, the cars were stretched only 17 inches and their roofs raised three inches. Power for both came from Cadillacs own massive 500 cubic-inch V8. Though awkward in appearance, the Fleetwoods provided excellent visibility for the president. Large greenhouses were made possible by the development of 2 3/8ths inch think bulletproof glass and powerful air conditioning systems that kept the cabin cool.” (source)







Part of the Shallow Wade exhibition in 2010 at OkOk gallery, in Seattle, WA, USA.