T-bone (Still Life 3)

index of sculptures 1988 to 2024

T-bone (Still Life 3)

2024
Bas-relief in salvaged wood, 176 x 155 x 18cm

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Studio Visit – 25 March 2024
just had a visit from butcher Chiel Neef. He came by to check what I’d done with his T-bone steak. A while ago I had asked at Sligro wholesale, a bit down the street from us, for the the Ultimate T-bone steak. I explained that it was for an art project. This made Chiel rather curious. He gave me the steak for free on the condition that he could come to see the end result. I’m glad he was very satisfied with it. All the details had the correct appearance; like the way the bone looks and the black flakiness of the dried edge. He was also glad that the meat had the correct ratio, with a relatively small tenderloin. But of course that was his own contribution, after all I had asked him for the ultimate cut!







Jericho

index of sculptures 1988 to 2024

Jericho

2020
Bas-relief in salvaged wood #129, 184 x 153 x 15cm.





This contorted shape of a decaying tree trunk, photographed in the Yosemite valley in California, was the subject for the work Holocene in 2013. Six years on it served as a template for Jericho. A work that like Holocene is also to be understood in relation to time, the title referencing the 10.000 year old tower of Jericho on the West Bank of the river Jordan that resembles a massive fossilized tree trunk. The tower is by far the oldest man-made monumental structure we know of. According to new insights it helped facilitate the transition to agriculture and the Neolithic revolution in the Levant (Barkai, R., & Liran, R, [2008]. Midsummer Sunset at Neolithic Jericho. University of Tel Aviv. Link: pdf ). This would make it a marker for the start of the process towards human hegemony of the earth, a process that is now reaching a critical phase.

View of the tower from the east showing both openings.
Image source: http://antiquity.ac.uk/projgall/barkai327/


Mediator

index of sculptures 1988 to 2024

Mediator

2019
Bas-relief in salvaged wood #126, 99 x 212 x 13cm.





In March 2019 Van der Ende paid a visit to artist Diet Wiegman in his Schiedam studio. He knew Wiegman to possess a collection of masks from around the globe, collected through the decades on auctions and flea-markets. The visit resulted in a series of photos of the back of these masks.
“I chose an African tribal mask as a starting point for the Mediator sculpture because it had an interesting shape and appearance. In all probability, it came from the Senufo culture in the region of Southern Mali, Northern Ivory Coast en Western Burkina Faso. Wiegman had bought this mask in an auction some 35 years ago, without any documentation. To try and reconnect it to its place of origin I collected street photos from the region and incorporated those into the work. The mosaic is executed in the strict color scheme of the local Bògòlanfini or ‘mudcloth’ technique, with dirty whites, red and yellow earth tones and black.”

The title Mediator comes from a quote from Pablo Picasso about his visit to the Trocadéro ethnographic museum in Paris in 1907, an occasion Picasso sees as the birth of modern art.

“When I went to the old Trocadéro, it was disgusting. The Flea Market. The smell. I was all alone. I wanted to get away. But I didn’t leave. I stayed. I stayed. I understood that it was very important: something was happening to me, right?
The masks weren’t just like any other pieces of sculpture. Not at all. They were magic things. But why weren’t the Egyptian pieces or the Chaldean? We hadn’t realized it. Those were primitives, not magic things. The Negro pieces were intercesseurs, mediators; ever since then I’ve known the word in French. They were against everything—against unknown, threatening spirits. I always looked at fetishes. I understood; I too am against everything. I too believe that everything is unknown, that everything is an enemy! Everything! “
(Picasso’s Mask, André Malraux, New York, 1976, p10-11)





Part of the Markers exhibition at Ron Mandos gallery, Amsterdam in 2020.


Floe

index of sculptures 1988 to 2024

Floe (Transition 5)

2018
Bas-relief in salvaged wood #122, 170 x 85 x 12cm.

Floe is the last in a series of five reliefs based on local archeological finds representing pots, dishes, and bottles.

Floe is based on an iridescent (wine or water) bottle from the second half of the eighteenth century. The word ‘floe’ is used for floating ice sheets in the polar regions.





Part of the Markers exhibition at Ron Mandos gallery, Amsterdam in 2020.


The Blimp

index of sculptures 1988 to 2024

The Blimp (Transition 4)

2018
Bas-relief in salvaged wood #121, 174 x 161 x 15cm





Part of the Markers exhibition at Ron Mandos gallery, Amsterdam in 2020.


Flux

index of sculptures 1988 to 2024

Flux (Transition 3)

2017
Bas-relief in salvaged wood #118, 173 x 107 x 11cm

Flux is based on a ‘starling pot’, a nesting pot, estimated to be from the 17th or 18th century. The color scheme revolves around oxblood red, pinks and greys.





Part of the Markers exhibition at Ron Mandos gallery, Amsterdam in 2020.


De Noord

index of sculptures 1988 to 2024

De Noord

2017
Bas-relief in salvaged wood #115, 94 x 234 x 16cm.



De Noord was a windmill on the Oostplein square in Rotterdam that was origianlly built in 1562 and later rebuilt and adapted several times. 14 years after it miraculous survival of the town fire of 1940 the mill caught fire and was demolished.
The bas-relief shows the tipical elongated shape of De Noord without the blades and other consctructions, the shape it had after the fire, but with the spectacular commercial signs that the mill had been know for since the early twentieth century.
(source: https://nl.wikipedia.org/wiki/De_Noord_(Rotterdam))





Part of the Markers exhibition at Ron Mandos gallery, Amsterdam in 2020.


Wedges

index of sculptures 1988 to 2024

Wedges

2014
Group of bas-reliefs in salvaged wood #103, size ca. 2 x 2m.





Made for the The factory Set retrospective at the Kunsthal in Rotterdam 2014/15. A total of 37 bas reliefs were shown. Most of them on loan.


Barn Raising

index of sculptures 1988 to 2024

Barn Raising

2014
Bas-relief in salvaged wood #101, 410 x 327 x 22cm.


A ‘barn raising’ is a collective action by a community to build a barn for one of its members. Barn raising was particularly common in 18th and 19th century rural North America. The tradition continues in some Amish and Old Order Mennonite communities, particularly in Ohio, Indiana, Pennsylvania, and some rural parts of Canada.
(source: wikipedia.org/wiki/Barn_raising) 







Made for the The factory Set retrospective at the Kunsthal in Rotterdam 2014/15. A total of 37 bas reliefs were shown. Most of them on loan.