Progress

index of sculptures 1988 to 2023

Progress (Maaskant poortgebouw)

2022
Bas-relief in salvaged wood, 164 x 131 x 15cm.
Collection of VORM, Rotterdam, Netherlands.





Work linked to the city of Rotterdam:


Floe

index of sculptures 1988 to 2023

Floe (Transition 5)

2018
Bas-relief in salvaged wood #122, 170 x 85 x 12cm.

Floe is the last in a series of five reliefs based on local archeological finds representing pots, dishes, and bottles.

Floe is based on an iridescent (wine or water) bottle from the second half of the eighteenth century. The word ‘floe’ is used for floating ice sheets in the polar regions.





Part of the Markers exhibition at Ron Mandos gallery, Amsterdam in 2020.


The Blimp

index of sculptures 1988 to 2023

The Blimp (Transition 4)

2018
Bas-relief in salvaged wood #121, 174 x 161 x 15cm





Part of the Markers exhibition at Ron Mandos gallery, Amsterdam in 2020.


Euromast 3

index of sculptures 1988 to 2023

Euromast 3

2018
Bas-relief in salvaged wood #119, 210 x 184 x 18cm.
Made on commission for Euromast Vastgoed BV, Rotterdam, Netherlands.
Private collection Rotterdam, Netherlands.


This work was on display at the Euromast observation tower 2018 through 2020.





Work linked to the city of Rotterdam:


Flux

index of sculptures 1988 to 2023

Flux (Transition 3)

2017
Bas-relief in salvaged wood #118, 173 x 107 x 11cm

Flux is based on a ‘starling pot’, a nesting pot, estimated to be from the 17th or 18th century. The color scheme revolves around oxblood red, pinks and greys.





Part of the Markers exhibition at Ron Mandos gallery, Amsterdam in 2020.


Superlotado

index of sculptures 1988 to 2023

Superlotado (Transition 2)

2017
Bas-relief in salvaged wood #117, 124 x 145 x 17cm.
Private collection, Berlin, Germany.


Superlotado is a word from the Portuguese language meaning ‘full to the brim’.
It signifies affluence and superabundance.





Part of the Markers exhibition at Ron Mandos gallery, Amsterdam in 2020.


Reverb-Decay

index of sculptures 1988 to 2023

Reverb/Decay (Transition 1)

2017
Bas-relief in salvaged wood #116, 119 x 218 x 13cm.
Concordia Collection, Rotterdam, Netherlands.



Reverb/Decay

Reverb/Decay is the first in a series of five reliefs based on archeological finds from the soil in and around the city of Rotterdam. They represent pots, dishes, and bottles that have been discarded throughout the history of human settlement in the area. All the original specimens come from the collection of Museum Rotterdam.
The works in the series are numbered Transition 1 through 5. The term Transition refers to their regular shapes, which are mathematically defined by a transition that is relative to a single axis.

The Reverb/Decay bas-relief is based on an albarello, an ointment jar, that dates from the sixteenth century. The glazed jar decorated with stripes and leaves was used as a starting point for intense experimentation with color and texture intended to make the work visually vibrate. The name is in reference to synthesizer equipment where the term can be found next to the buttons that regulate audio loops. “Reverb” regulates repetition within the loop and “Decay” regulates decline.





Part of the Markers exhibition at Ron Mandos gallery, Amsterdam in 2020.


De Noord

index of sculptures 1988 to 2023

De Noord

2017
Bas-relief in salvaged wood #115, 94 x 234 x 16cm.



De Noord was a windmill on the Oostplein square in Rotterdam that was origianlly built in 1562 and later rebuilt and adapted several times. 14 years after it miraculous survival of the town fire of 1940 the mill caught fire and was demolished.
The bas-relief shows the tipical elongated shape of De Noord without the blades and other consctructions, the shape it had after the fire, but with the spectacular commercial signs that the mill had been know for since the early twentieth century.
(source: https://nl.wikipedia.org/wiki/De_Noord_(Rotterdam))





Part of the Markers exhibition at Ron Mandos gallery, Amsterdam in 2020.


Industrie gebouw

index of sculptures 1988 to 2023

Industriegebouw

2017
Bas-relief in salvaged wood #112, 139 x 196 x 14cm.
Private collection, Rotterdam, Netherlands.




Industriegebouw Goudsesingel.

Het Industriegebouw is a building in Rotterdam designed by H.A. Maaskant, W. van Tijen and E. Groosman. In typology, function and appearance it became a powerful symbol of the Wederopbouw, the post war rebuilding policy of Rotterdam. The building was completed in 1952 and over the past few years it has been revived as an important cultural hub. 






Some examples of work done on commission:


Salvage

index of sculptures 1988 to 2023

Salvage (Baltic Ace)

2016
Bas-relief in salvaged wood #109, 162 x 213 x 15cm.
Corporate collection, Rotterdam, Netherlands.

Baltic Ace was a roll-on/roll-off car carrier that sank in the North Sea on 5th December 2012 after a collision with a container ship. It sank within 15 minutes in shallow waters. Only 13 of the crew of 24 were rescued. The wreck was lifted in chunks in 2015 and transported to Waalhaven in Rotterdam where the photo was taken that was the basis for the bas-relief.
(source: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/MV_Baltic_Ace)



All the works that were part of the Bare Bones exhibition at Ron Mandos Gallery in Amsterdam in 2016.


Boompjes

index of sculptures 1988 to 2023

Boompjes

2009
bas-relief in salvaged wood #58, 105 x 90 x 12 cm.
Collection of Marc Overman, Rotterdam, Netherlands.





Work linked to the city of Rotterdam:


Town Bus

index of sculptures 1988 to 2023

Stadsbus (Town Bus)

2007
Bas-relief in salvaged wood #39, 183 x 112 x 14cm.
Museum Rotterdam, Netherlands.





Work linked to the city of Rotterdam:


Euromast 2

index of sculptures 1988 to 2023

Euromast 2

2005
Bas-relief in salvaged wood #28, 205 x 175 x 16cm.
Private collection, Rotterdam, Netherlands.





Work linked to the city of Rotterdam:


Euromast 1

index of sculptures 1988 to 2023

Euromast 1

2005
Bas-relief in salvaged wood #27, 205 x 182 x 16cm.
Collection Museum Rotterdam, Netherlands.

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Construction of the Euromast bas relief.


Euromast

The Euromast observation tower was designed by Hugh Maaskant and built in 1958-1960 to a height of 101 meters. A further 85 meters were added in 1970 so that it would remain the tallest built structure in Rotterdam. Originally intended for the Floriade event in 1960 in Rotterdam, it has since come to symbolize the spirit of post World War II reconstruction.



Remarkable Rotterdam. A New High in the Lowlands.
Video by Pim Korver for ©PKFV. 1970.





Work linked to the city of Rotterdam:


Shipsection

index of sculptures 1988 to 2023

Shipsection [2003]

2003
Bas-relief in salvaged wood #19, 185 x 195 x 16cm.
Private collection Rotterdam, Netherlands.

The Shipsection bas-relief was based on the Costa Classica ship section. Follow this link to learn about its role in the demise of Camell Laird shipyard in Liverpool and about how it ended up in Rotterdam.:



The Costa Classica ship section

In 2002 Cammel Laird Shipyard in Birkenhead near Liverpool was building a 14 storey ship section to upgrade the Costa Classica cruise ship owned by Italian Costa Cruises. The almost 200 year old shipyard was famous in the seventies and eighties for building nuclear submarines. Contracts had dried up with the end of the Cold War, and they were looking for a way into the civilian market. This assignment looked like a promising start. When the Costa Classica was already on its way to Birkenhead to be cut in half, Costa Cruises was taken over by Carnival Cruises, an American firm. Carnival doesn’t do ship extensions, they just replace outdated ships. News reached the shipyard that the Costa Classica had made a U-turn and was now steaming back to Italy. The new owners said they had reports of faults in the section. Within months the shipyard was declared bankrupt and its workers were laid off.
www.telegraph.co.uk/…/The-straw-that-broke-Cammell.html

“The 14 storeys high section was bought by a consortium of Dutch investors. It was scrapped in Heijsehaven harbour in Rotterdam, just opposite my studio. My bas-relief was constructed while the original section was being dismantled. I even got to visit the section before they started. The only way in was to be hoisted on top of it by a tall crane. The upper decks were nearly finished, with spaces fitted as restaurants, a discotheque and a swimming pool. Lower down were hundreds of cabins and a fully equipped engine room – all brand new. It was an eerie experience.”

Image top: photo of the original section in the Heijsehaven by Ron van der Ende.

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Photos taken during our visit to the section by Peter Breevoort.





These works were part of the Mobility exhibition at gallery Delta in 2003:


Fly Over

index of sculptures 1988 to 2023

Fly Over

2002
Bas-relief in salvaged wood #16, 350 x 210 x 20cm.
Built for Hogeschool Rotterdam (Rotterdam University), Netherlands.


Fly Over was the first bas-relief that was made on commission. It was constructed especially for the auditorium of the new Economic Faculty (H.E.S.) in Rotterdam, part of Rotterdam University. The auditorium is a large space with dark grey walls and bright red linoleum floors. The colour of the floors is incorporated in the work as a red haze. The relief itself was based on photo’s of Kleinpolderplein, a large and complex stacked interchange built in Rotterdam from 1958 onwards.

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View of Mobility at gallery Delta. Hans Sonnenberg is seen seated at his desk.
Fly Over was temporarily installed at the gallery for the occasion of this show..





These works were part of the Mobility exhibition at gallery Delta in 2003:


Parkflat

index of sculptures 1988 to 2023

Parkflat

2002
Bas-relief in salvaged wood #15, 135 x 165 x 14.
Collection of Museum Rotterdam, Rotterdam, Netherlands.
Photo: Theo van Pinxteren, Museum Rotterdam.

The Parkflat under construction, 12 August 1957.
Photo by Herbert Behrens © Nationaal Archief.


Parkflat, Rotterdam

The Parkflat apartment block is situated on the corner of Westzeedijk and Kievitslaan in Rotterdam, overlooking the park. Designed by E.F. Groosman, it was built between 1948 and 1958 as the first large residential building of Rotterdam’s postwar reconstruction period. The Parkflat contains 50 relatively luxurious apartments, even though the tower block was constructed in a modified version of the MUWI concrete panel system.
This building system was widely used for mass housing construction all around the Netherlands until it fell out of favour in the early 1970s.
(source: rotterdamwoont.nl/…/Parkflat)
(source: bestaandewoningbouw.nl/muwi)





Work linked to the city of Rotterdam: